Thursday, March 09, 2006

"How to become a comic book artist"

One of my goals for this blog, is to use it to inspire other people to do what they love. I believe that we are created to be happy. Not to work a job, or make a mark, or impress other people. But to do what we love and love what we're doing - every day! Whatever that may be. For the purposes of this blog, I'm writing about doing comic books.

"How to become a comic book artist"

In the last week, the subject of making a living with art has come up several times. Enough to warrant some thoughts here. And I can, for the first time, honestly answer this question with some real perspective.

"Doing what you love"

There is a difference between doing what you love and making a living. It's possible to do both. But one must come before the other. Not because of the other. Doing what you love means doing it because it's fun. Not for any other reason. I'm making a small living now with drawing comics. But I'm not doing it to make a living. I quit working a job, and quit doing caricatures for money, because I'm making a living. But I'm doing it because it's fun. It wasn't always that way. And for a time I resented and hated drawing because I made it more than it's meant to be. Once you do that you're screwed. Once you make it more than it is, and forget why it was important to you to begin with, you're in big, big trouble. Every artist has to learn to not make it more than it is. You have to draw because you want to draw-- first and foremost. And once you get used to doing it every night, your drawings will tell you what to do with them. Not the other way around.

Just remember, there's no finish line with art (so to speak). Finishing one drawing, one painting, or even one book isn't going to make you successful. Needing to draw every night because you love it-- that will make you successful. Being productive, with anything is hard. But it's not about wanting to do it, or thinking about doing it... it's about doing it. Slowly making it part of your life until it IS your life. And doing it because it's fun. Doing it like you're a kid. Not because it will get you somewhere, or pay your bills, or make you better than other artists. Don't make it more than it is. That sucks all the fun out of it. Till there's nothing left but resentment and bitterness. Nothing left but the end. We kill the things we love that way.

"Ego and Insecurity."

Every artist walks a fine line between being confident and being arrogant. No matter how good you get you will never be better than some people and always be better than the rest. It's essential to understand and accept that. The better you get, the more you realize there is to learn. It's a never ending process. As it should be. Use that to your advantage. What you do with what you have is up to you though. Don't compare yourself to other artists. It's easy to get lost in "I can do it better than them." or "I'll never be as good as them." Those are only excuses to not try. Just learn to work with what you already have, and continue to grow as much as you can throughout your career. You can make a living doing comics in any style if you market it the right way. It doesn't matter. The important thing is to realize that you are not better than anyone and no one is better than you. It's all perception. All that matters is what YOU do. What YOU put in people's hands and how often you do it.

"Learning to do it right means learning to do it wrong."

Robert F. Kennedy once said "Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly." Failure is the key ingredient to learning - Just like walking is controlled falling - Art is learning to manipulate mistakes. I guarantee that the best artists you'll ever meet have drawn 1000 times more than you'll ever see from them. Because only the best work is seen by the public. The rest are the mistakes they made, to learn to get to where they are. It's all a numbers game. You have to draw to learn. You have to put stories out to learn what sells. You have to pay your dues.

That said, you don't have to do it all the hard way. The right teachers can help you along. Saving you years and years of teaching yourself. Find mentors, teachers, role-models, wherever you can. You want to be the best, learn from the best. And diversify, learn from as many people as you possibly can. And never stop learning from other people. There was a time when I felt I'd let down my earliest students. But I've come to realize, that teaching is simply demonstrating that something is possible. Learning, is making something possible for yourself. Take what you can from wherever you can, and learn to make it possible for yourself.

"Leap of faith"

You only have a safety net if you plan to use it. I've always believed that. There's a point in every artist's career when they need to make the leap. And I'll tell you... it's not easy, and it sure as hell is not comfortable. There's no clear sign to let you know when it's time. And there is no guarantee that it will work. But that's how the universe works. There are two reasons for this. First reason is physics, you have to do something before you can get the result you want. There must be action before there can be a reaction. The second reason is, well... accountability. You have to put yourself on the line. I won't eat this month if I don't draw comics. I won't pay my bills if I don't draw comics. If it's my only option I will find a way to make it happen. Fear is your friend. Fear is the doorway to freedom. Use it to your advantage.

Keep in mind that I'm speaking to all levels of talent here. You can take the leap at any level of your career. I've seen all levels of talent make it work. I will say, the more you know the easier it is to make it happen. Like GIJoe says... "knowing is half the battle." My rule of thumb is this... "You have to know where you want to go before you can figure out how to get there." You can start off making $10 - $20 a page pretty easily. But unless you invest more into it, that's all you will be making 3 or 4 years down the road. It becomes nothing but a paycheck then. A small one at that. Just like you can put out cute little books and get them published. But if you don't have goals for yourself you are doomed forever to work to achieve the goals of others. Have a destination for yourself and work at least a little every day to get there.

"Reality check."

I know the reality of it all. We all have our reasons why it's just not "that" easy to make this happen. I had my excuses. And my excuses were harder to accept than just being married and having kids (the more realistic excuses). But that's where the first lesson here comes in. Doing what you love. Make it fun again, make the time to make it fun again. And make that time every single night. And one day it will grow into something bigger. And eventually, you'll be ready to take that leap. There's a lot to learn... whatever you want to do with your life. But the sooner you start, the quicker you'll get there. But it's definitely worth the journey. Your worst day doing what you love will be a thousand times better than your best day doing anything else. Just remember to never lose sight of why you're doing this. Because it's fun.

--Will

"What we have is based upon moment-to-moment choices of what we do. In each of those moments, we choose. We either take a risk and move toward what we want, or we play it safe and choose comfort. Most of the people, most of the time, choose comfort. In the end, people either have excuses or experiences; reasons or results; buts or brilliance. They either have what they wanted or they have a detailed list of all the rational reasons why not." ~ Anonymous

9 Comments:

Blogger francis said...

Very nicely put! And I wholeheartedly agree - success comes from having that love and passion for the work in the first place. You can't expect to "make it/get rich" etc. if you don't have that passion to begin with.

3/09/2006 03:06:00 PM  
Blogger BrianMORANTE said...

Well said. I think a lot of artists are waiting for the BIG answer to everything. Something that will complete their circle. They will find out that there is no big answer, just tiny ones that move you forward bit by bit. I saw an interview with oscar nominee Terrance Howard, when asked at what point did you start to bcome successful at acting, he said -"I got out of my own way"

3/09/2006 06:28:00 PM  
Blogger Bill Drastal Blog Mode!! said...

Hey Will, well Put. I feel like I'm living in the midst of transition from stagnant routine to who knows what. Scarey. Wish me and Karen luck in June when we move to LA.

-Bill

3/09/2006 10:16:00 PM  
Blogger Will Terrell said...

I've recieved a lot of good feedback on this post. I'm glad it's been helpful to everyone. I'm glad I'm finally in a place where I can have that sort of perspective.

You gotta love what you're doing. And you have to do it because you love it. That's the only way.

3/11/2006 10:37:00 AM  
Blogger earthlovin said...

will, you are not only a great artist but, you are a wonderful writer as well! you are so right about not letting fear keep you from doing what you love. it's hard not to get caught up in this "money brings happiness" mind set. thanks for putting a reminder out there for us.

3/14/2006 01:56:00 PM  
Blogger Will Terrell said...

Thank you Heather. That made me smile.

I believe the pursuit of happiness is a never ending stuggle. Because happiness is something you are.. not something you find. It's a way to travel, not a destination. My life has been so amazing ever since I accepted that.

3/16/2006 05:03:00 PM  
Blogger NikiWonoto said...

Hi
I just happened to accidentally find your writing.
And btw, I'm from faraway country in Southeast Asia, Indonesia.

I just want to say, I thank god so much for finding this writing of yours. 'cuz this is EXACTLY what I need during these recent times, where I've always seemed to find soo many excuses & "reasons" for not doing my music.

Yes, I am a musician (a part-time musician, still), and I just love to compose music.
However, in these recent times, especially starting year 2008, I've honestly found that I am composing less and less, due to a lots of self-doubts, questionings, and probably most importantly, because of "be realistic" outlook instilled upon me by many people in my life.
There was even one period of time (around last November 'till this February) where i've just STOPPED altogether from composing ANY music! just because I kept allowing myself to think that "it's not good" , or "it's not worth it!" , or "it's not going to make any MONEY!" , stuff like that....

Your writing here, however, has reminded me back to the very purest essence of when I first encountered music & felt such tremendous energy to keep doing it. It was back when I was in my early 20's..those were such happy times, and in effect, my most productive moments in composing music.
Now after reading this (and also some great comments here) , I feel so much moved & touched to take back what i've long forgotten: to just DO music because I LOVE it so much. and that's all matters!

Thank you once again for this beautiful writing!
It is really touching & inspiring.

3/26/2009 11:41:00 PM  
Blogger NikiWonoto said...

Link to some of my music compositions: http://www.myspace.com/nikiwonotomusic
Hope you would like & enjoy them :)

You can always write back to me, in my personal email: nikiwonoto@gmail.com .

Thank you once again!

3/26/2009 11:45:00 PM  
Blogger Daniel said...

Thank you, Will.
I am currently at a crossroads as I am an artist that is beginning to freelance. At the same time I have a family I am helping to support. I am having doubts whether I can contribute as much as I would like.

You words reminded me why I enjoyed drawing so much in the first place...because it is fun.
And you're correct "your drawings will tell you what to do with them, not the other way around".

I can rely on my talent if I give my talent a chance to rely on me.

11/08/2010 10:02:00 PM  

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